The Greatest Question Ever Asked

I suppose we’ve all had this experience. We’re reading a newspaper, computer screen or book and something jumps out at us that we decide is the best insight we have ever seen. Invariably, it will be exactly what we believe but expressed beautifully by someone else.

That is exactly how the link struck me.  It a reflection of an author who interviewed a towering figure in the genre of Buddhist literature and history. The subject of the interview related an experience as a young man of walking in the woods and suddenly being overcome with questioning and wonder. I would summarize his description as being over whelmed by the question, “Why am I here?” Of course, the broader version would be, “Why are any of us here?”

The young man traveled the world searching for an explanation of his experience and an answer to his question. He thought he would find it in the Eastern version of Buddhism. Instead he found there simple explanations sometimes serving the interests of clergy.

He then immersed himself in the U.S. version of Buddhism. That, too, did not provide a satisfactory answer. He is convinced there is no supernatural power so that leaves the question of why we are here to something else.

The idea we are no more significant than a house fly is hard for the human ego to handle. We need something bigger.

Yet, when we take out the super natural we are left with a series of insignificant events that leave us with insignificance.

5 Responses

  1. Schurkey

    “when we take out the super natural we are left with a series of insignificant events that leave us with insignificance.”

    An excellent argument in favor of a supernatural God.

  2. Juan Ruiz

    Having read the link, it seems Mr. Batchelor is enormously self-possessed, and quite presumputuos in believing anyone else gives a rat’s patoot about his beliefs.

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