Pray To Play College Coaches Should Learn From Tim Tebow.

First an Iowa State University basketball coach and now a University of Georgia football “chaplain” have bragged about helping players in their “spiritual development.” These are both state universities established by state governments. They are not religious institutions.

College players have scholarships so they need to play to get this money. Implied is that if they pray with the coach they will more likely get to play–it will pay.

One thing Christian college coaches could do is look at the practice of indoctrinating students with a coach’s religion and see if they do better in their sports performances or in their post college lives with religious indoctrination as opposed to without it. I’ve never heard the numbers are better with the coachs’ religions.

I can envision the thinking of religious coaches. “If I can get my players all juiced up by introducing religion, my players will have the edge over players whose coaches just encourage players to do their best.” Universities are supposed to be places where rational thought is taught. If a coach cannot present evidence his religious inspiration helps students on and off the field he/she should get a job at a private Christian school or as a preacher.

We do have some anecdotal evidence about the relationship between religion and sports. The most public prayin’ football quarterback in football, Tim Tebow, was cut again by a pro football team. Maybe he will succeed someday.

So far, his prayers have not helped.

9 Responses

  1. Paul Larsen

    “We do have some anecdotal evidence about the relationship between religion and sports. ”

    We have even better evidence linking coffee drinking to improved athletic performance … have a latte … run faster …

  2. Jonah

    Hi Jon – “So far, his prayers have not helped.” Really? Tim Tebow shares his prayers with you, and they are about succeeding on the field? That is no where near the Tim Tebow I’ve read about and heard. Congrats on your prayer interpretation skills!

    I think it’s commendable when a coach or teacher cares about an individual beyond their performance on the field. Yes, there are outliers, but we will find a far greater number of students and athletes who appreciate their mentor figures teaching them how to be men and women of character and dignity than coldly sticking to the subject at hand.

    Students want teachers and coaches to be genuine. If freethinking inspires you, share that. If God inspires you, share that.

    A university should be a marketplace of ideas. If preventing universities from becoming a one-worldview dogmatic indoctrination camp is the mission, religion is not that goal’s biggest enemy today,

      1. Jonah

        “Did the other gods come back to life like Jesus?”

        Nope, I don’t have any reason to believe that. “Other” gods I’ve heard about don’t have the support of history and a coherent and consistent claim to truth.

        I believe the bible is true. I believe the eye witness accounts of his resurrection. I know you want independent accounts, but if those who saw it couldn’t deny their own eyes and hands, your “independent” verification is impossible. The Christian faith as we know it today was growing rapidly in the region right away, when these eye witnesses were there to interrogate to the skeptic’s content.

        1. Jonah 9:29 I believe the eye witness accounts of his resurrection

          Perhaps a hair splitting interest of mine, there were no “eye witness accounts of his resurrection.” There are stories that people say him after he was dead. When we have Paul the quarter back who called the plays of early Christianity claiming to “see” him in a vision, it suggests all accounts of “seeing him” were visions. Only the devout “saw” him.

          1. Jonah

            “Perhaps a hair splitting interest of mine, there were no “eye witness accounts of his resurrection.” There are stories that people saw him after he was dead.”

            That’s an accurate correction. I don’t claim witnesses to the rising-from-the-dead process in the tomb, but rather to the resurrected Jesus shortly thereafter.

        2. Jonah 9:29 “Did the other gods come back to life like Jesus?”
          Nope, I don’t have any reason to believe that. “Other” gods I’ve heard about don’t have the support of history and a coherent and consistent claim to truth.

          I wish you could sit in the audience of true believers of other gods. We have had several of them talk to our Freethinker groups.

          A few years ago we had a young scientist, a Hindu native of Indian, talk to us about Hinduism. He outlined various gods and their roles in the faith. He concluded by saying, “These are scientifically proven facts, not merely religious beliefs.” I’m sure even your confidence would reach the level of his confidence. He indirectly dismissed the Christian god as something of the imagination.

          1. Jonah

            “I wish you could sit in the audience of true believers of other gods.”

            I have, … I went to college! That was meant partially as a joke, with some truth mixed in. One of my best friends is on the Eastern religion / agnostic / atheist spectrum. We’ve had many a discussion, and I’ve read some of his books. I enjoy mixing it up with those who hold a significantly different worldview.

            Although a high confidence level can help in persuasion, it in and of itself doesn’t prove or disprove anything. We probably can agree on that.

        3. Jonah 9:29 I believe the bible is true. I believe the eye witness accounts of his resurrection

          Then you would no doubt take literally Matthew 27:52. When the crucifixion happened graves opened up and long death corpses walked out. They went into town and “were seen by many.” (It doesn’t mention how they looked or smelled with no remaining flesh.) When some unknown author in ancient times wrote, “there were witnesses”, it does necessarily mean there were witnesses. It probably means the unknown writer made this story up.

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