Tim T-Bone, the Praying Football Quarterback.

Q.  Thank you, Tim, for talking with us.  What is you reaction to being traded when you have been such a Christian celebrity playing for the Denver Broncos?

TT.  The team management is going to pay millions more for a new, but aging, quarterback.  I know what is happening here.

Q. The team’s management, I understand, thought you often were not prepared for the upcoming series of plays during the game–and–that was why you failed so often.

TT.  Not prepared, that’s impossible.  I wonder who said that.  I spent my time praying when the defense was on the field.  That way, when it was time for the offense to take to the field, I was full of God’s grace.  That’s being prepared.

Q.  Well, that just it.  The management wanted you to be wearing headphones while the defence was on the field.  That way, the coaches up in the  booth could compare what they saw the other team’s defenses doing with what you saw.  They wanted to discuss with you  ideas for the next series–get your reaction.  But you were unavailable, on your knee praying.  Don’t you think they have a point?

TT.  Absolutely not.  How could the coaches know better than God what to expect the defenses to do during the next series?

Q.  The team management wonders if you are more interested  in God than in football?

TT. Jesus said we Christians would be persecuted.  Anyone can see that’s what this trade is all about.

Avatar of Jon Lindgren

About Jon Lindgren

I am a former President of the Red River Freethinkers in Fargo, ND, a retired NDSU economics professor and was Mayor of Fargo for 16 years. There is more about me at Wikipedia.com.
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23 Responses to Tim T-Bone, the Praying Football Quarterback.

  1. Doubtful says:

    Why would you bother to write such drivel? Tebow has never said anything even remotely close to this. Why is it that this man who celebrates his on field success more quietly and unobtrusively than most players draws the ire of so many? Why do you feel the need to misrepresent him so that you can mock him? Seems very immature to me.

    • PK says:

      Agreed. Who even cares about football. It’s just a bunch of overpaid grown men running around in a field with a ball, playing a children’s game. So who cares if one of the players is a Christian and isn’t afraid of saying it. I wouldn’t say he’s been persecuted at all by the industry, considering how financially blessed he’s already been. I would say the man has done a lot more good with his orphanage and donations to children’s hospitals and such than you ever will, or would be willing to do Jon even if you had the resources. You’re a joke. One of the most mindless things you’ve ever written.

      • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

        PK 6:18 I wouldn’t say he’s been persecuted at all by the industry, considering how financially blessed he’s already been.”

        Yes, that was the point. So far as I know he has never said he was persecuted. I included it because I would guess others have or will say this.

    • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

      Doubtful 5:09 “Why do you feel the need to misrepresent him so you can mock him?”

      When people get millions of dollars to pray in public, I think it’s fair to do satire about them.

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        I suspect he got paid to play football, not praying. The praying is a freebie. I doubt that praying was in his contract.

      • Doubtful says:

        I don’t think it is satire when you have to invent behavior to ridicule. You may think it is folly to quietly than God after having gotten what you want, or to use your celebrity to help those less fortunate than yourself, but that is not what you ridiculed. You invented behavior to ridicule. To call it satire is a real stretch. I think it is closer to hate.

        • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

          Doubtful 9:12 “..when you invent behavior to ridicule.”

          I invented the conversation. I did not invent his praying posture on the sidelines–somehow finding locations in the busy and crowded area where there was an unobstructed opportunity for TV and print media to film him.

          • Doubtful says:

            You did not even mention his praying on the sidelines except an oblique reference in your claim that he spent so much time praying that he did not play football, so what does it matter that you did not invent his praying as a touchdown celebration?

  2. Avatar of seaofstories seaofstories says:

    I think it’s fairly obvious that he is getting paid to pray. His skills on the field are not a good match for the way that the professional game is played. The coaches in Denver were getting so much grief from the fans about not playing him when the QB who started the season for them struggled that they were forced to go with Tebow.

    The religious zellots out shouted the football zellots on Tebow.

    • Doubtful says:

      Right. And then when they played Tebow they lost every game, right? No? Oh well maybe he can play football then. All these people who know how the game should be played but end up not winning, how does that work?

      • Avatar of seaofstories seaofstories says:

        To me this is where the whole Tebow thing gets interesting. The NFL is a copy-cat league. All 32 teams do almost exactly the same thing. Its very orthodox. I’d love nothing better than to see Tebow succeed as a football player and completely up-end the institutional understanding of what it takes to be a professional QB. If he succeeded at that he’d revolutionize the game. Within the confines of football that would be a very christ like achievment and part of what you’re seeing is him being persecuted for it by people who support the institution that the NFL as built, not people who care about religion.

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      Show me the contract that says he was payed to pray.
      Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think it is wise to “showboat” prayer. I believe that should be a private thing between a person and his God. I just don’t believe he was paid to pray. If he was paid to play football, the reason for his release is evident.
      Jon said; ” When people get millions of dollars to pray”….
      Re. football, baseball, hockey, etc. I could care less. I would rather watch a ping-pong game.

  3. Avatar of Mac Mac says:

    It’s been said here a hundred times, but I still find it curious that athletes seem to think they and their team are chosen by God to be victorious; or at least are asking God to choose them as superior to their opponent.
    When they don’t win or when they botch things in a big way, does that mean they’ve fallen out of God’s favor?

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      Mac; Exactly. The same problem exists with those who follow prosperity theology. “Maby I didn’t pray hard enough, believe enough, ask for enough, etc.

  4. Santa says:

    The team was doing poorly, and finally they decided to start Tebow. the Broncos then went on a very impressive, almost improbable, winning streak and made the playoffs. If you truly believe he was “paid to pray” because he was not good enough otherwise, you would have to admit the power of prayer propelled the Broncos to victory. No offense but your attempt at comedy sucks; stick to your day job (you know, the full time job of making outrageous claims about Christianity)

  5. Brandon says:

    Jon,

    I imagined someone with your background would have more respect for someone who has a differing opinion on what is more important in life. What you wrote is not only untrue, but is also extremely childish. It seems everyone who doesn’t understand the faith others have feel the need to ridicule it and make a mockery of it. There are many things you could write about that you know alot about. If you stick to those topics then freethinking might not be so bad…

    • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

      Brandon 2:44 Thanks for coming on to comment. You obviously feel strongly about this and it’s good to make your objections know.

      The blog was obvious parody. In my view, when a big celebrety making millions of dollars makes large displays of pray in public, he/she is a candidate for parody. That he prays instead of prepares is worth questioning.

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        Who are you to say he can’t do both? Two minutes out of the day does not make it an occupation. Have you investigated the time he has spent in prayer verses the time spent in practice?

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        Or ten minutes. Do you question the length of time he spends in the bathroom to take a poop or other time he sees as necessary? After all, it isn’t on the field practicing. No, you center on his visible activity in his practice of the faith, and that is your excuse. Very very small of you.

        • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

          Wanna 3:13 “Very very small of you.”

          I would guess you, or other commentors here on the T-Bone issue, have never actually been the subject of many years of public taunts, cartoons, editorials from the owners of the local paper, and hate calls from having your personal number in the phone book. I have–it really doesn’t matter that much.

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        Get over it, and move on.

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        I haven’t seen you make comments on other football players on their made public activities. For instance; drugs, steroids, wife/girlfriend beatings, etc. All these activities that have a deliterious effect on the sport. No, only because praying is a faith based activity, which you detest, and look for any opportunity to denegrate.
        PS, as I said before, I would preffer he do his praying privately, but that is his business, and his only.

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