Hitler Was a Christian.

It’s discouraging to read from time to time the comment, “Hitler was an atheist.”  The implication is that an atheist would organize the mass murder of Jews, but a Christian would not.

Hilter never said he was an atheist.  He said and wrote, “I am a Christian.”  The Catholic Church of that time never said Hilter was an atheist.  It said, “Hitler is one of ours.”

This peculiar practice of some people in the faith to reject factual information is a worry.  The denial of Hilter’s religious inclinations is but a sympton of denial of many other facts that are inconvenient truths.  This includes evolution.

While, of course, there are large segments of the Christian faith that do not reject these truths, it is the other parts of the faith that are a concern for the future of our, or any, country.  We can see, every day, the hazards resulting from societies where blind religious faith dominates.

Currently, some middle east countries want “democracy”, but also put into constitutions the requirement that religious rules trump civil rules. That is, mythological beliefs will trump rules established by man, even the majority of voters.  Religious leaders, speaking for god, will always have more power than elected officials.

This is where myth takes societies.  The healthiest thing a country can do is reject conclusions based on mythological gods and false interpretations of history.

People of faith could start by accepting the fact Hilter was a Christian.

 

 

Avatar of Jon Lindgren

About Jon Lindgren

I am a former President of the Red River Freethinkers in Fargo, ND, a retired NDSU economics professor and was Mayor of Fargo for 16 years.
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76 Responses to Hitler Was a Christian.

  1. Wanna B Sure says:

    Before making such a positive statement, one should Google the question; “Was Hitler a Christian”. Click on every site, and read every one to their respective ends. The conclusion would be yours. That and a nickle will get you a five cent cup of coffee.
    Jon; Whether he was…or not, according to your conclusion is irrelevent. Like you Jon, Hitler and Stalin started as children in “the church”. By your own admission, you didn’t remain. There is sufficient evidence that Hitler used the church as a means to further his political ambitions.

    • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

      Wanna 12:31 There can be no doubt he used the church as a means to further his poltical ambitions. But, did not that happen last night in Iowa, and the night before somewhere else? Of course, others can raise questions about anyone. But, it seems to me, if there are reasons to question the sincerity of his Christianity, there are even more reasons to question that he was an atheist. The is associating Hiltler with atheism is simply a form of slur.

      People can say my making a positive statement as I did in the blog is also an insult to Christianity since I don’t know what was in his head. It still has more going for it than the positive statements made by countless others, such as Bill O’Rielly, that Hilter was an atheist. The best thing for all would be to stop referring to him as either.

    • entech says:

      And the church encouraged him all they wanted in return was control of the education of the young.
      only one of the hierarchy that i know of was excommunicated and that was for marrying a protestant.

  2. Avatar of marv marv says:

    Unless you just define a Christian in some almost racial way, as in born in a nominally Christian place and family must be a Christian, I don’t see how anyone could look at what a Christian is and what Hitler was and rationally conclude that he was a Christian. Did Hitler use the term Christian concerning himself, yep, he was indeed known to do that.

    I guess it does explain some things though about why you seem to be so anatagonistic towards Christianity, because you can’t tell that at least some people who would refer to themselves as Christian are in no way shape or form Christian. Somehow, you even flip things and seem to try and define Christianity by those people instead of using Christ.

    • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

      marv 1:01 Thanks for joining the discussion and for the reasonable post.

      You write that people say they are Christian and do things that are not “Christian”. Nevertheless, Hilter seemed to think he was a Christian, and Christians, the leadership the Catholic church seemed to think he was a Christian also.

      The question is, why does anyone thind an atheist would do the terrible things he did either. There is nothing written or stated by atheists that says people should be mass murdered.
      To say that, as many such as Bill O’Rielly and Pat Roberston have done, is to slur and unjustly insult. There is more evidence Hilter was a Christian than there is he was an atheist.

  3. Henry says:

    Jon, I’ve been a visitor on your blog for a very short time. I’ve already noticed a number of trends. One is that you are repeating yourself.

    Again, I must ask. What are Hitler’s fruits?

    • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

      Henry 1:48 “I’ve been a visitor on your blog for a very short time…”

      Henry, you’re not a visitor, you’re a resident. : )

    • Bob says:

      Jeez Henry. “short time”? What the…….you’ve been here longer than I have.

      • Henry says:

        Well Bob, I am very surprised you consider my time here to be anything but a short time. I say this in light of your evolution theology and its timeframe. : )

        However, if it feels like I have been here a long time, maybe that is an indication of how much a pain I have been to the atheist bunch. I don’t know that is my primary intent, although perhaps a little mortal emotional pain will keep you from a little immortal pain. I am torn between the following:
        1. My own self-serving enjoyment in debate and discussion, which incidently helps solidify my Christian beliefs.
        2. Knowing that you guys already have the law and the prophets, meaning the matter is out of my hands.
        3. It is biblically consistent that much energy is expended on finding lost sheep.

        • entech says:

          Henry, you say you don’t know that to deliberately annoy is your intent, I am inclined to think that that must be the case as it would explain many things: just my opinion, of no import.

          I would however ask that you re-evaluate your statement about ‘a little mortal emotional pain will keep you from a little immortal pain’; this is starting to sound very much like the justification for every inquisition.

          • Henry says:

            entech, please feel free to ignore me (you can’t, failing a couple of times in the past to fulfill your vow). Inquisition? That is a rather strong charge. The inquisitions were rather forceful, contrary to my pleadings.

          • entech says:

            True, I try but it is like ignoring an insect bite, you know you shouldn’t scratch but in a weak moment?

            Inquisitions? Not really an extreme analogy, nothing starts of as it ends. Even Hitler’s final solution started off as fairly mild opposition in the early days of political activism. The fact is that the end result of the actions of the defenders of the doctrine of the faith was torture and burning at the stake; confess and repent and you could be burned dead instead of alive but you would burn. The justification was that it was necessary to be punished now to be saved from eternal punishment later. Pain is never inflicted with such pleasure as when it is done for the victims own good (can’t remember the origin but that is a paraphrase from someone like Pascal).

            I think all of these things are a matter of degree and opportunity, as the grip and control of the soviets and the Nazis increased their actions got worse – Hitler’s list of ‘undesirables’ grew to include all Slavs, Gypsies, Asians, Blacks, Communists, Homosexuals and on and on, Jews were just the top of the list, when Stalin was signing lists of people for execution I have heard that he had been known to say, “not enough”. Actions like that of Hitler, Stalin and Torquemada were not the actions of atheists or theists; they were the actions of insanity, perhaps inspired by faith or ideology but madness just the same.

            The Roman Inquisition’s final extreme was the boiling in oil of Pomponio Algerio in 1544 the early days of the reformation, his status as a Civil Law student was supposed to allow some tolerance of free speech, however this was the early days of the protestant Reformation and the Church of Rome must have felt some threat because his crime was heresy and his statement in court sealed his fate, “I say that the Church deviates from the truth in so far as it says that a man could not do anything in any way good on his own, since nothing praiseworthy can proceed from our corrupt infected nature except to the extent that the lord God gives us his grace… the Roman Catholic Church is a particular Church and no Christian should restrict himself to any particular Church. This Church deviates in many things from truth.” Not exactly atheistic blasphemy, although another University Student Thomas Aikenhead from Edinburgh was executed for blasphemy in 1697 ( I almost said murdered because according to the law at the time a first offense the punishment was sack cloth and ashes, not until a third offense was the death penalty prescribed). In spite of an appeal the Church of Scotland’s General Assembly urged “vigorous execution” to curb “the abounding of impiety and profanity in this land”. In the Soviets and satellites at different times and to different degrees criticism of atheism has been a serious crime, death penalty, more than likely.

            Don’t fool yourself extremes start mildly. Banning books is a precursor to burning books, in the extreme burning books leads to burning writers.

  4. Bob says:

    “My feelings as a Christian points me to my Lord and Savior as a fighter. It points me to the man who once in loneliness, surrounded by a few followers, recognized these Jews for what they were and summoned men to fight against them and who, God’s truth! was greatest not as a sufferer but as a fighter. In boundless love as a Christian and as a man I read through the passage which tells us how the Lord at last rose in His might and seized the scourge to drive out of the Temple the brood of vipers and adders. How terrific was His fight for the world against the Jewish poison. To-day, after two thousand years, with deepest emotion I recognize more profoundly than ever before the fact that it was for this that He had to shed His blood upon the Cross. As a Christian I have no duty to allow myself to be cheated, but I have the duty to be a fighter for truth and justice… And if there is anything which could demonstrate that we are acting rightly it is the distress that daily grows. For as a Christian I have also a duty to my own people.”
    -Adolf Hitler, in a speech on 12 April 1922 (Norman H. Baynes, ed. The Speeches of Adolf Hitler, April 1922-August 1939, Vol. 1 of 2, pp. 19-20, Oxford University Press, 1942)

    Hitler’s anti-Semitism grew out of his Christian education. Christian Austria and Germany in his time took for granted the belief that Jews held an inferior status to Aryan Christians. Jewish hatred did not spring from Hitler, it came from the preaching of Catholic priests and Protestant ministers throughout Germany for hundreds of years. The Protestant leader, Martin Luther, himself, held a livid hatred for Jews and their Jewish religion. In his book, “On the Jews and their Lies,” Luther set the standard for Jewish hatred in Protestant Germany up until World War II. Hitler expressed a great admiration for Martin Luther.

    Hitler did not have to parade his belief in God, as so many American Christians do now. Nor did he have to justify his Godly belief against an Atheist movement. He took his beliefs for granted just as most Germans did at that time. His thrust aimed at politics, not religion. But through his political and religious reasoning he established in 1933, a German Reich Christian Church, uniting the Protestant churches to instill faith in a national German Christianity.

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      See Hitler’s “Table Talks”, as referrenced in Google search; “Was Hitler a Christian”.

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        See also “Hitler’s secret Conversations”…1941-1944.

      • Wanna B Sure says:

        Also ublished by Oxford University Press.

        • entech says:

          Whichever you care to believe you will find evidence to support your own viewpoint, bit like creationism really. The worst sites are these called revisionists.

          Thinking about it if there was ever going to be a second coming that would have been a good time, save so many Jews (gypsies, gays etc.), but maybe some one actually does not care?

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            Interesting attempt at diversion. Meaningless red herring.

          • entech says:

            Main point was consistent with you plea to use Google, You can find strongly opinionated views on his theology or lack of it. Personally I don’t care, I am prepared to say he was a lunatic and leave it at that, when people start to act outside of any sane and reasonable manner their beliefs are largely irrelevant, of course, you may need to take these beliefs into account when determining how they reached that position.

            The last paragraph was a comment, it would have been one of many occasions when the world was in need of a saviour.

  5. Daren says:

    The best thing is to let Christianity die a natural death. When understanding of the universe has become widespread, Christian doctrine will be convicted of absurdity. Christianity has reached the peak of absurdity and thats why someday its structure will collapse. The only way to get rid of Christianity is to allow it to die little by little. We wil see to it that the Churches cannot spred abroad teachings in conflict with the interests of the states.

    This was said to be a quote from Hitler. 90% of the German people were said to be Christian at that time. This could be why he would say that he is a Christian. I myself would say that he was not a Christian.

  6. Stan says:

    I would say that by the time he became chancellor Hitler worshiped no one but himself. He attempted during the war to replace Christianity with a religion of his own making, drawing from the norse and Germanic gods as a successful attempt to control at the most fanatical segments of the population. Of all the people he sent to the camps only half were Jews the rest were a combination of gypsies, homosexuals, Lutherans and Catholics. How many priests and ministers died denying the Nazi’s?

  7. Bob says:

    Future generations should remember that Adolph Hitler could not have come into power without the support of the Protestant and Catholic churches and the German Christian populace.

    Read Mein Kampf and you will see how Christian was Hitler.

  8. Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

    We can look at Hitler on all four sides, turn him upside down, inside out and we will not find any hint that he was an atheist.

    People can say he did not “act like a Christian”, or do things Christians do. Another way of expressing that is he did not act like one thinks a Christian SHOULD act. But, Christians do all kinds of things, so that really doen’t really disqualify him.

    We know he was not a Hindu, or, member of any other religion. The only reason anyone calls him an atheist is because they don’t like him–there is no evidence he is an atheist. That leaves one choice.

  9. .E says:

    I am done being fascinated by what atheists have to say. Garbage in garbage out. Bye

  10. Bob says:

    I know the following is long, but it is history everyone should know, they won’t tell you this in school or church.
    Luther’s anti-Jewishness

    Unfortunately few popular books on Luther go into detail about Luther’s anti-Jewishness, or even mention that he had a hatred for Jews at all. This has resulted in a biased outlook towards Martin Luther and Christianity. This unawareness of Luther’s sinister side, while honoring his “righteousness” leads to a ratcheting promotion of Luther which supports a “good” public image while also transporting his Jewish beliefs to those who carry the seeds of anti-Semitism. This will present an unwanted dilemma for many Christians because Luther represents the birth of Protestant Christianity as well as the genesis of the special brand of Jewish hatred that flourished only in Germany.

    Although Luther did not invent anti-Jewishness, he promoted it to a level never before seen in Europe. Luther bore the influence of his upbringing and from anti-Jewish theologians such as Lyra, Burgensis, (and John Chrysostom, before them). But Luther’s 1543 book, “On the Jews and their lies” took Jewish hatred to a new level when he proposed to set fire to their synagogues and schools, to take away their homes, forbad them to pray or teach, or even to utter God’s name. Luther wanted to “be rid of them” and requested that the government and ministers deal with the problem. He requested pastors and preachers to follow his example of issuing warnings against the Jews. He goes so far as to claim that “We are at fault in not slaying them” for avenging the death of Jesus Christ. Hitler’s Nazi government in the 1930s and 40s fit Luther’s desires to a tee.

    So vehemently did Luther speak against the Jews, and the fact that Luther represented an honorable and admired Christian to Protestants, that his written words carried the “memetic” seeds of anti-Jewishness up until the 20th century and into the Third Reich. Luther’s Jewish eliminationist rhetoric virtually matches the beliefs held by Hitler and much of the German populace in the 1930s.

    Luther unconsciously set the stage for the future of German nationalistic fanaticism. William L. Shirer in his “The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich,” puts it succinctly:

    “Through his sermons and his magnificent translations of the Bible, Luther created the modern German language, aroused in the people not only a new Protestant vision of Christianity by a fervent German nationalism and taught them, at least in religion, the supremacy of the individual conscience. But tragically for them, Luther’s siding with the princes in the peasant rising, which he had largely inspired, and his passion for political autocracy ensured a mindless and provincial political absolutism which reduced the vast majority of the German people to poverty, to a horrible torpor and a demeaning subservience. Even worse perhaps, it helped to perpetuate and indeed to sharpen the hopeless divisions not only between classes but also between the various dynastic and political groupings of the German people. It doomed for centuries the possibility of the unification of Germany.”

    In Mein Kampf, Hitler listed Martin Luther as one of the greatest reformers. And similar to Luther in the 1500s, Hitler spoke against the Jews. The Nazi plan to create a German Reich Church laid its bases on the “Spirit of Dr. Martin Luther.” The first physical violence against the Jews came on November 9-10 on Kristallnacht (Crystal Night) where the Nazis killed Jews, shattered glass windows, and destroyed hundreds of synagogues, just as Luther had proposed. In Daniel Johah Goldhagen’s book, Hitler’s Willing Executioners, he writes:

    “One leading Protestant churchman, Bishop Martin Sasse published a compendium of Martin Luther’s antisemitic vitriol shortly after Kristallnacht’s orgy of anti-Jewish violence. In the foreword to the volume, he applauded the burning of the synagogues and the coincidence of the day: ‘On November 10, 1938, on Luther’s birthday, the synagogues are burning in Germany.’ The German people, he urged, ought to heed these words ‘of the greatest antisemite of his time, the warner of his people against the Jews.’”

    No apologist can claim that Martin Luther bore his anti-Jewishness out of youthful naivete’, uneducation, or out of unfounded Christianity. On the contrary, Luther in his youth expressed a great optimism about Jewish conversion to Christianity. But in his later years, Luther began to realize that the Jews would not convert to his wishes. His anti-Jewishness grew slowly over time. His logic came not from science or reason, but rather from Scripture and his Faith. His “On the Jews and Their Lies” shows remarkable study into the Bible and fanatical biblical reasoning. Luther, at age 60 wrote this dangerous “little” book at the prime of his maturity, and in full knowledge in support of his beliefs and Christianity.

    Few people today realize that Luther wrote ‘On the Jews and Their Lies.’ (He also wrote such works like “Against the Sabbatarians.”) Freethinkers should become aware of the anti-Semitic influence that Luther has brought on the world. His vehement attack on Jews and his powerful influence on the believers of the Germans has brought a new hypothesis to mind: that the Jewish holocaust, and indeed, the eliminationist form of anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany may not have occurred without the influence from Luther’s book “On the Jews and Their Lies.”

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      Bob; Strange, your “they won’t tell you that in school or church”. Not true!!!! They were the very places we were informed/introduced to the entire problem of Luther’s diatribe on the Jews. This is not new news. Unlike you, Luther was obviously not perfect. Unfortunately some think he was, as you obviously believe you are too.

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      Bob; If an un-truth is declared emphatically, is it a lie, even when said in ignorance?

  11. Bob says:

    Wanna 3:24
    I prefer Wanna to read the actual texts, and come to my own conclusions.

    All you have to do is read Hitler’s actual speechs, and Mein Kampf to see he considered himself a Christian and used the text from the bible to back up his beliefs and actions.

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      So by your own admission, you were raised in a Christian home, and left the faith. Knowing that Hitler and Stalin were also both raised in Christianity, using your methodology, all three of you MUST be considered to be Christian to this very day, despite evidence to the contrary.

  12. Bob says:

    In case you didn’t get this the first time Wanna.

    “My feelings as a Christian points me to my Lord and Savior as a fighter. It points me to the man who once in loneliness, surrounded by a few followers, recognized these Jews for what they were and summoned men to fight against them and who, God’s truth! was greatest not as a sufferer but as a fighter. In boundless love as a Christian and as a man I read through the passage which tells us how the Lord at last rose in His might and seized the scourge to drive out of the Temple the brood of vipers and adders. How terrific was His fight for the world against the Jewish poison. To-day, after two thousand years, with deepest emotion I recognize more profoundly than ever before the fact that it was for this that He had to shed His blood upon the Cross. As a Christian I have no duty to allow myself to be cheated, but I have the duty to be a fighter for truth and justice… And if there is anything which could demonstrate that we are acting rightly it is the distress that daily grows. For as a Christian I have also a duty to my own people.”
    -Adolf Hitler, in a speech on 12 April 1922 (Norman H. Baynes, ed. The Speeches of Adolf Hitler, April 1922-August 1939, Vol. 1 of 2, pp. 19-20, Oxford University Press, 1942)

  13. Bob says:

    To Wanna 4:44
    You display typical infantile religious behavior, very childish of you.
    I realize its painful for faithheads to grow up and face the truth that everything they base their world view on, has not only been a lie, but is very very dirty.

    Read Martin Luther’s book, “On The Jews and Thier Lies” A dirty little book your Lutheran church won’t want you to know.

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      Have read it, have it, among many others. Why don’t you read the rest? Oh, that’s right, you do the same things the fundamentalists do. Only read what you want to believe, afraid of the rest. Agenda first, conclusion supportedy by agenda last. Very dirty.

    • Wanna B Sure says:

      “won’t want you to know.” Didn’t I just tell you that we were informed of the whole mess IN church? Now I know why you can’t understand, you can’t read .

      • entech says:

        Wanna, are you vying for Henry’s job?

        • Wanna B Sure says:

          Entech; Oh for Pete’s sake, can’t you read what I said in my 4:22?

          • entech says:

            There was a whole lot more than Luther and the inherent Antisemitism of the Pauline doctrines.

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            Yup, got it., and it’s an unbelievable stretch to call it antisemitism. Inherent Antisemitism? No. Remember virtually all the first Christians were Jews. Against the legalism of the OT Judaism, yes. Fulfillment of the OT, yes. Not replacement of Old Covenent, but completion through the New Covenant. (Not Paulene).

          • entech says:

            “I think that Christian antisemitism started with Saul of Tarsus, weak or not, take it or leave it.”

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            It started about the time of “Two men went up to the Temple to pray”. Both were Jews. Before Saul of Tarsus

        • Wanna B Sure says:

          Entech; Pretty weak. Is that the best you can do?

          • entech says:

            Just saying you concentrated on the statement that the church didn’t want you to know that Luther was antisemitic. Bob had a lot more to say about Hitler and what he wrote and said.

            I think that Christian antisemitism started with Saul of Tarsus, weak or not, take it or leave it.

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            I studied in depth both sides of the subject before Bob was born. Bob needn’t think he is an authority on the subject. He may have some ideas, but not a balanced clue.

          • entech says:

            Then we all bow to your superior knowledge and experience.
            Change you login name you are sure.

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            Be nice. Wouldn’t want to be forced to send “Quigley down Under”. (smilie face)

          • entech says:

            Just looking back Wanna your November 21, 2011 at 11:36 pm I must agree about antisemitism being an unbelievable stretch, we should call it as it is, Jew Hatred. And although Christians developed it to a fine art it has been around longer than Saul’s new religion. Probably, at least, since the exile to Babylon where they realised that it was not necessary to have the one temple to worship the one true God, God was everywhere and they were his people anywhere: this meant that they did not have to convert to the local Gods; they could keep their one true God and remain his people. This is when they started writing down their history, that fabulous collection of myth and magic, history and invention.

            Most upsetting when you reject another’s Gods, Romans v Christians, Catholics v Protestants and so on: poor old Judeans all they wanted was to keep their own God and not be slaves – been hounded and hated ever since. Irony is that the people that stole and changed their God are amongst the worst haters (guess that would include Islam as well as Christendom).

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            Probably could go back to the exodus, Philistines, Moabites, etc. But when she shoe was on the other foot, the Samaratins were the underdogs of Juda. But then, there are “good Samaratins” in all groups. They just don’t get the press like the baddies. Today’s news is no exception.

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            PS; I have mentioned the Christian Palistiniens in the past. The area around Nazareth was as I understand almost all Christian Palestinian. Today, they have been reduced to a small contingent. Land taken away by Israel, and persecuted by both the muslim Palestinians and the Isralies, caught in the cross fire you might say. Screwed from both sides, Culturally, and politically. All since 1948. Obviously the Christians are not the majority there. Even the Neo-cons ignore them, and support Israel so Jesus has a landing pad in Jerusalem when Jesus comes to rule on this earth for 1000 years, (according to dispensational premelleialism), but we have been there before too.

          • entech says:

            Moab, Ammon, Philistia the whole area from of Canaan and the others were a bunch of city states dominated by Egypt, they had different Gods and were always fighting, I am sure the hatred was mutual. Anyway how could anyone trust the offspring of the incestuous son of Lot? (Now that is ad hominem)
            Israeli archaeologists are still looking for proof that the Exodus ever happened. Egypt dominated and colonised the entire region. Why, on earth, would the Israelites flee Egypt so that they could run to Egyptian Canaan.

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            Good question. Go figure. ” The Habirew” were an enigma. Wasn’t there. Smilie face.

          • Wanna B Sure says:

            Could be the Cannanite women. You know their reputation. Another smilie face.

  14. Jon has not idea whatsoever of what a Christian really is. He has his own created idea of a Christian in his own mind..the better to criticize them. He does not know the Bible…. esp. the New Testament and its teachings on following Christ (this is what a true Christian is) You have to read and study the Bible to know it and he does nothing of the sort..his Bible knowledge consists of smorgasbord parts of it that he despises.
    It is impossible for Jon to determine what a Christian does and is.
    Hitler was NOT a Christian….being a nominal Catholic is not being a Christian.
    No TRUE Christian would have done what Hitler did.

  15. Bob says:

    After I read the bible, that’s when I really, really became an atheist.

    I mean, Have you read that evil thing?

    • Henry says:

      Bob, may I make a suggestion? You seem like the open-minded type. When you really want to get serious about reading the Bible, pray to God to forgive you for your sins, and ask God to send the Holy Spirit back to you. Then proceed to read the Bible. Then try it again in the order described. Just try that.

  16. Bob says:

    To Henry 8:34
    Only after you read Richard Dawkins “The God Delusion” Sam Harris’s “Letter To A Christian Nation” and Christopher Hitchen’s “God Is Not Great: How Religion Poison’s Everything”
    You probably haven’t read any of these books even once, much less twice.

  17. Stan says:

    May I suggest c S Lewis’s “Mere Christianity” and G K Chesterton’s “Orthodoxy”? As a professor at Oxford Lewis is no dummy either.

  18. Bob says:

    To Stan 11:20
    Not sure if you were addressing me or not, I’m assuming, but I can’t be saved Stan. I’m happy being a godless heathen.
    My wife and wish we’d never married just so we can fornicate indefinitly.
    I loathe the koran, bible and torah. Abraham was a punk even considering slaying his own child. A real criminal. And Abraham’s god? a Hitler, a killer, a genocidal maniac.

    • Henry says:

      Just remember, Bob, with God all things are possible.

      • Bob says:

        Just remember Henry, you being a bible thumper has to live within the terrible constraints of the bible.

        • Wanna B Sure says:

          Bob; Can you please list these “terrible constraints of the bible”, and their sources that are are a concern to you? Thank you.

        • Henry says:

          Bob:“Just remember Henry, you being a bible thumper has to live within the terrible constraints of the bible.”

          I don’t recall ever thumping a Bible. What does that action do, Bob? You seem familiar with it.

          If I do not live within the constraints of the Bible (a sin in other words), what happens, Bob? Please tell. Based on your reported history, you are a Christian, Bob. You should therefore know.

  19. Being a “nominal” anything is not necessarily being a Christian and yes, it is in the Bible—all 4 gospels and all of the Letters that follow that Gospels. Each one is instruction on how a Christian lives. It requires reading and studying the Bible …intensely and with faith. Something you probably would not do.
    Being a member of a church does not make you a Christian…ever under any circumstances.

    • Avatar of Jon Lindgren Jon Lindgren says:

      Buffalogal 3:55 “Being a ‘nominal’ anything is not necessarlity being a Chritain and yes, it is in the Bible…”

      I was not aware the term “nominal Christian” was in the Bible. I’m making the assumption, perhaps incorrectly, that the phrase in one that came from someone’s interpretation of what is there, not the actual text.

      • Henry says:

        Jon: “I was not aware the term “nominal Christian” was in the Bible.”

        It is, Jon. The Church of Laodicia. You should have been familiar with that being you are a Christian based on your reported history.

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